Protected: Importance of Equal Education in Nigeria

This is a test post, the source can be found here.

The world we live in is not a fair place and we are not all born into this world through ideal circumstances. Despite Thomas Jefferson’s idealistic sentiment,[note] A test footnote for when I am inclined to  diverge on a tangent[/note]

all men are not created equal and not all people are privy to equal opportunities.

This grim reality is illustrated in most places in the world, but especially true in third world countries.

History Class at Tuskegee
History Class at Tuskegee

The country whose interests are dearest to my heart is the Federal Republic of Nigeria. Nigeria is a classic example of a nation where the divisions between the upper and lower classes are exceptionally stark and the divisions are exacerbated by a dwindling middle class. I won’t discuss philosophically whether or not it is fair that certain people are born into greater privilege than others because that is simply an unfortunate but unavoidable fact of life. However, I am greatly concerned by the lottery we play in Nigeria concerning the education of our youth. This unequal access to education is the origin of what perpetuates classist divisions in Nigeria.

Understanding

A Random Picture
A Random Picture




The primary cause of this statistical inequity is one which has plagued humans since the beginning of time, the human weakness of greed. Echoing, biblical history when Judas betrayed Jesus for thirty silver shekels, Nigerian politicians betray their own people for millions of dollars a year.

Schooling 

 

  1. There was a time when Nigerian schools delivered an effective education to the extent that there was little difference between sending your children to a local school and sending your children to a school abroad.
  2. There was also little distinction between a child who had been educated at a public school and one who had attended a private school because the public school system was quite strong. 
  3. However, problems slowly began to arise after Nigeria gained independence from the British in 1967.